Click here to go back to the home page Click on this link to view the screenreader friendly and text only version of this website

Program

4:30-5:00 pm Poster Session and Reception
  2nd floor, Atrium
   
5:00-5:15 pm Welcome Remarks 
  Robert Muller, Dean, National College of Education
  Judah Viola, Dean, College of Professional Studies and Advancement
 

2nd floor, Atrium
Zoom Registration (Welcome Remarks and Keynote Panel) 

   
5:15-6:05 pm

Keynote Panel
Moderated by Robert Muller

 

Ciuinal Lewis, Community Psychology ‘11

 

Kizawanda ‘Kiza’ Olowe, Educational Leadership  ‘18

  Paul Reiff, Curriculum and Social Inquiry ‘16
   
6:15–7:15 pm    Breakout Session One
1-A   

Classroom 4025
Zoom Registration

1-B   

Classroom 4020
Zoom Registration

1-C   

Innovation Lab 3112/14
Zoom Registration

   
7:20–8:20 pm      Breakout Session Two
2-A

Classroom 4025 
Zoom Registration

2-B

Classroom 4020 
Zoom Registration

2-C

Innovation Lab 3112/14 
Zoom Registration

 

POSTER SESSION 

Educators’ Perceptions of Restorative Justice, Care and Disability: A Phen[wo]menological Study
Jennifer Hull, Disability and Equity in Education

African American Males: Challenges Faced Transitioning from High School to Higher Education
Shenika Jackson, Community Psychology

Factors that Impact Reader Identity: A Narrative Study
Michelle Pegram, Reading and Language

Latinx Sense of Belonging in Higher Education: A Narrative of An Undocumented, Latinx, First Generation College Student
Monica H. Ramos, Curriculum, Advocacy & Policy

A Correlational Study of Mothering Empowerment and Activist Orientation for Black Mothers
Deidra Somerville, Community Psychology

The Confluence of Food Allergies and Parent Advocacy in Schools: A Phenomenological Qualitative Study
Anne Zavell, Disability and Equity in Education

 

BREAKOUT SESSION ONE 6:15-7:15 pm

Classroom 4025

Zoom Registration

Session Moderator: Jeannie Zeitlin 

1-A

6:15 pm
Teachers Observing Teachers to Improve Practice (Zoom)
Christine McMullen, Educational Leadership

6:35 pm
My proposed program evaluation of the New Teacher Mentoring and Induction at One School (Zoom)
Tamara Baker-Drayton, Higher Education Leadership

6:55 pm
The Formal Observation and the Potential for Self-Reflection, Collaboration and Evaluation that Supports Professional Growth in Illinois
Merryl Brownlow, Educational Leadership

 

Classroom 4020

Zoom Registration

Session Moderator: Jade Coleman

1-B

6:15 pm
Ethnic Identity and Awareness of Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome
Ebony Bradford-Thomas, Community Psychology

6:35 pm
Challenges and Opportunities of Chinese Immigrant Students with Intellectual Disabilities in Transition Services
Xin (Helen) Qing, Disability and Equity in Education

6:55 pm
The Impact of Separation Caused by Incarceration Between Fathers and Their Children: A Quantitative Examination Identity, Family and Community
La’Shawn Littrice, Community Psychology

 

Innovation Lab 3112/3114

Zoom Registration

Session Moderator: Todd Price

1-C

6:15 pm
Equitable Implementation and Facilitation of Senate Bill 100 for District-Wide Student Success and Safety: A Policy Advocacy Project
Dorothy Thompson, Educational Leadership

6:30 pm
Mental Healthcare of Latinos - Barriers to Access
Eileen Johnson, Community Psychology

 

BREAKOUT SESSION TWO 7:20-8:20 pm

Classroom 4025

Zoom Registration

Session Moderator: Tina Edwards

2-A

7:20 pm
An Evaluation of Avid as a Supplemental Education Program at the Middle School Level (Zoom)
Lori Beth Bradner, Educational Leadership

7:40 pm
Elementary Teachers of Writing: Paths, Passions, and Practices
Amy Huftalin, Reading and Language

8:00 pm
Elementary School Latinx Parent Involvement Through Reading Engagement Opportunities: A Case Study of a Spanish-Speaking Parent Book Club Using Children’s Literature
Pablo Ochoa, Reading and Language

 

Classroom 4020

Zoom Registration

Session Moderator: Shani Beth-Halachmy

2-B

7:20 pm
Afterschool Programs- Making a Difference (Zoom)
Contobia Horsey-Adams, Educational Leadership

7:40 pm
The Impact of the Social Support of Parents, Teachers and Peers on Financial Literacy for Youth from Under-Resourced Households
Glenda Alexander, Community Psychology

8:00 pm
Bilingual Daily Linguistic Interactions in Mexican Families
Adelfio Garcia, Reading and Language

 

Innovation Lab 3112/3114

Zoom Registration

Session Moderator: Diane Salmon

2-C

7:20 pm
Professional Learning Communities: A Program Evaluation (Zoom)
Chundra Evens, Educational Leadership

7:40 pm
Using Culturally-Tailored Holistic College Health Assessments at a Historically Black College and University (HBCU) to address health inequities
Tonya Roberson, Community Psychology

 

KEYNOTE PANELIST BIOS

Ciuinal Lewis works as an Organizational Management Consultant for non-profits and serves as an adjunct instructor for National Louis University in the department of Health Services Administration. Lewis She holds a bachelor’s degree and master’s degree from Western Illinois University and a doctorate in Community Psychology from National Louis University in 2011. Currently, Lewis is a member of the Board of Directors for We Raise Foundation, the Illinois Public Health Association, the American Psychological Association, and the Midwestern Psychological Association.

Kizawanda ‘Kiza’ Olowe is the Director of Specialized Services at Urban Prep Academies. She oversees the special education and counseling departments across the network. Before this role, she taught high school for eight years and worked as a school social worker for six. She recently defended her dissertation “Implementing Evidenced-Based Social and Emotional Learning Standards, Programs, and Supports in Illinois’ Schools” at National Louis University in April of this year. She holds licenses in clinical social work, school social work, school counseling, human development, special education, and administration. 

Paul Reiff is the English Department Supervisor at Libertyville High School. Having worked in education since 1988, Reiff earned National Board Certification in 2004 and a doctorate in Curriculum and Social Inquiry in 2016. He is currently interested in standards based grading and proficiency based reporting.

 

ABSTRACTS: INDIVIDUAL PRESENTATIONS

Alexander, Glenda. Community Psychology. The Impact of the Social Support of Parents, Teachers and Peers on Financial Literacy for Youth from Under-Resourced Households

This mixed-method study evaluated factors impacting financial literacy for youth at a Midwestern catholic grammar school, particularly the social support of others and the impact on financial readiness. Research on financial literacy indicates that many youth do not have a basic understanding of financial concepts. A lack of financial knowledge negatively impacts financial decisions in adulthood. A grasp of financial concepts at early age assists in amassing financial knowledge over a lifetime. In the quantitative study, relationships were identified between financial literacy and social support. Regression analyses indicated that social support was a strong predictor of financial literacy. In the participatory qualitative study, focus groups were conducted with students, parents and teachers to gain an in-depth understanding of the connection between social support and financial literacy. The findings suggested that the social support of others is beneficial to understanding financial concepts.

2-B

 

Baker-Drayton, Tamara. Higher Education Leadership. My proposed program evaluation of the New Teacher Mentoring and Induction at One School

West Creek Elementary is a provision II, Title 1 School that has struggled for many years to retain highly qualified teachers and maintain an acceptable letter grade status of a ‘C’ or higher. It is often times inexperienced teachers that are hired to work in schools such as West Creek due to the fact that many teachers leave schools like West Creek within the first three years of teaching. Therefore, West Creek Elementary implemented a New Teacher Mentoring and Induction program to increase teacher retention and build teacher capacity. A voluntary survey and interview was conducted with the administrators, mentors, and mentees to gain a perspective of the effectiveness of the New Teacher Mentoring and Induction Program at West Creek Elementary. Results of the study indicated that the New Teacher Mentoring and Induction program was effective in enhancing teacher pedagogy, but results still showed that teacher retention was still low. For that reason, West Creek Elementary will continue to focus on building teacher instructional capacity, but implement strategies to decrease the stress level that new teachers may encounter when working is historically low performing schools. Low performing Title I schools often experience a lower teacher retention rate when compared to schools with higher academic achievement. Vacancies are typically filled with new or inexperienced teachers who leave the school within a few years. To counter this problem, West Creek Elementary introduced a comprehensive New Teacher Mentoring and Induction initiative. Program evaluation was a voluntary anonymous written survey with an optional in person interview conducted with the participants and administrators. Results indicated that the New Teacher Mentoring and Induction program was effective in enhancing teacher pedagogy, not effective in enhancing teacher retention, and that greater emphasis should be placed on addressing the stress and demands of working in a high pressure, results oriented environment.

1-A

 

Bradford-Thomas, Ebony. Community Psychology. Ethnic Identity and Awareness of Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome

Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome is a concept that many shy away from not realizing the overarching impacting that is has related to Ethnic Identity and Parenting styles within many African American Households. This research hopes to provide insight into the concept of Post Slave Syndrome and how years of generational trauma has been a trickle down effect to how African Americans manage and interact in their daily lives.

1-B

 

Bradner, Lori Beth. Educational Leadership. An Evaluation of Avid as a Supplemental Education Program at the Middle School Level

This is a study of AVID as a supplemental education program at the middle school level that includes a quantitative evaluation of the academic efficacy of AVID utilizing anonymized, longitudinal student achievement data. The second section is a qualitative evaluation of the AVID program at one middle school within that district to determine the perceived efficacy of the AVID program among stakeholders using surveys and interviews. This also includes a discussion of the necessary change in leadership determined by the evaluation portions of this project. The third portion outlines a policy change essential for satisfactory outcome as defined by AVID national criteria for the middle school to move from a Highly Certified Site to Demonstration School Status.

2-A

 

Brownlow, Merryl. Educational Leadership. The Formal Observation and the Potential for Self-Reflection, Collaboration and Evaluation that Supports Professional Growth in Illinois

This research explores how a change in the definition of the formal observation may improve the teacher evaluation system in the state of Illinois. Currently, the formal observation must be conducted in person as defined by administrative code. To increase the value and impact of the formal observation as a tool for reflection and professional growth, this paper advocates for a videotaped alternative as an option in addition to the current in-person model. The intent of including a videotaped option is to empower the teacher in the process and increase ownership for building skills as a reflective practitioner. The videotaped model also promotes a more collaborative context for the post observation conference that may lead to a more direct impact on improving teaching and learning. The state of New York (2017) has already implemented a videotaped observation model as an alternative in the teacher evaluation process and the premise of advocating for such a policy was recently the subject of a study at The Center for Educational Policy Research at Harvard (Kane, et al., 2015). This policy advocacy document discusses the context and conditions by which to operationalize a similar vision in the state of Illinois.

1-A

 

Correa, Emilie. Educational Leadership. Advocacy and Implementation of Social Emotional Learning

Social Emotional Learning (SEL) standards were adopted by the state of Illinois in 2004. Local SEL policy was adopted by District 1234 in 2010. This policy advocacy work presents how findings from a district’s SEL Audit helped a team of administrators identify areas for growth and advocate for compliance of existing state and local SEL policy. This work documents how a district went from no SEL programming, to the creation of an SEL Task Force, the powering of SEL standards, and the planning for systemic implementation of SEL. According to research (Durlak, Weissberg, Dymnicki, Taylor, & Schellinger, 2011), students who participated in SEL programming demonstrated significantly improved social and emotional skills, attitudes, behavior, and academic performance (11 percentile point gain in achievement). Further research (Zakrzewski, 2013) proposes that the benefits of SEL programming is not only intended for students, it has a profound positive impact on teachers that embrace SEL tenets. These findings are only a sample of the growing empirical data that bolsters the positive impact of SEL programming in our schools. By learning more about SEL and the benefits of SEL programming, educators, policymakers, and the greater community can join together to advocate for social and emotional well-being in our nation’s schools.

1-C

 

Evens, Chundra. Educational Leadership. Educational Leadership

My journey through the evaluation of Professional Learning Communities is presented in this research document. The program evaluation incorporated the impact of implemented Professional Learning Communities within a public school when faced with multiple years of declining student achievement. Instructional strategies and collaboration were main components of instructors daily and weekly routine. Goal setting within instructors developed Individual Professional Development Plans became a strategy for accountability. Qualitative and quantitative data analysis of the implemented Professional Learning Communities identified relevant themes regarding the impact of the initiative, as well as the effects on student achievement and instructional practices. This is an account of an implemented instructional strategy to address societal pressures for improved student achievement when faced with declining student achievement.

2-C

 

Garcia, Adelfio. Reading and Language. Bilingual Daily Linguistic Interactions in Mexican Families

This study explored the bilingual linguistic interactions in Mexican families and the impact on children's language and literacy development. This qualitative study gathered data using different methods: interviews, direct observations, and participant observation to examine parent's perceptions on their own educational path in comparison to their children's educational path in an American school system.

2-B

 

Horsey-Adams, Contobia. Educational Leadership. Afterschool Programs- Making a Difference

An Abstract of An Evaluation of the Effects of Afterschool Programs in Title 1 schools on Elementary Minority Student Academic Performance BY Contobia Horsey-Adams In our ever-global changing society, families have been forced to work beyond the normal 8 to 5pm hours. As a result, many families are faced with the dilemma of balancing work and raising children. One of a possible solution is to implement afterschool programs to provide a safe and positive environment for those students. Today hundreds of before and after school programs has been established in many Title 1 elementary schools, which has helped solve many of the problems facing our communities and educational system today. Improving the educational outcomes for students who are at risk for academic failure is an important issue for educators and policymakers Recent studies suggest that afterschool programs has decreased negative behaviors, decreased violence and crime, and helped improve the quality of life among minorities. Despite these positive achievements, there are still missing gaps especially in the area of socio-emotional learning and parental engagement. This study aimed to investigate if afterschool programs in Title 1 communities is a direct contributor to student’s academic gains. In my study, I used data from surveys, interviews and focus groups from an elementary afterschool program and how the program measures in engagement and school outcomes. The results of this study showed significant gains between participating in the program verses non-participating. There was evidence to show that at risk minority students who were failing in more than one class was showing academic gains on test assessment and classwork. In reality, after school programs began to see significant academic success as opposed to academic failure. Research found that teachers worked very hard during the homework sessions to learn the strategies that complement the regular school day assignments. Concluding this paper, I will show the advantages of having afterschool programs for minority at risk students will help improve academic gains in the classroom.

2-B

 

Huftalin, Amy. Reading and Language. Elementary Teachers of Writing: Paths, Passions, and Practices

This mixed-methods study examined the personal and professional experiences of early elementary teachers related to writing, seeking relationships between their experiences and instructional practices. Data included a survey and two focus group interviews with kindergarten, first, and second-grade teachers in a large urban district. Three major themes emerged from the data concerning the writing instructional practices: (a) the importance of peer collaboration centered on instructional practices and professional learning, (b) the consistent use of a common writing curriculum, and (c) the application of a Writer’s Workshop approach to teaching writing.

2-A

 

Johnson, Eileen. Community Psychology. Mental Healthcare of Latinos - Barriers to Access

Latinos are the nation’s largest and fastest growing minority group, their experiences and access to mental healthcare continues to be a serious concern. This study builds upon existing literature of barriers, which hinder access, and explores perceptions of how partnerships between medical and mental health care professionals can help. This study shares healthcare professionals’ viewpoints of how mental healthcare for Latinos can be improved through partnerships. Participants surveyed and interviewed were over eighteen years old and well versed with the Latino population. Research questions were answered showing barriers in place from 2013 are still at the forefront of hindering access. Partnerships between healthcare professionals have been strongly noted to help.

1-C

Littrice, La'Shawn. Community Psychology. The Impact of Separation Caused by Incarceration Between Fathers and Their Children: A Quantitative Examination

There is a significant impact of the separation that is caused by a father being removed from the life of their child/children due to incarceration. When a father has interaction with the criminal justice system, it often affects his attitudes about fatherhood, his hope for the future, the amount of time he has spent with his child and how he may attempt to rebuild his relationship with his child/children. Children need their fathers and fathers affect their children emotionally, socially, cognitively, etc. Alternative like the barrier of incarceration should be re-examined to determine how to keep fathers and their children connected. Ultimately, it will determine the strength of the relationships.

1-B

 

McMullen, Christie. Educational Leadership. Teachers Observing Teachers to Improve Practice

Watching experts execute their craft allows for learning. In four schools, this type of learning, teachers watching one another teach, was made available and the feedback from those interviewed showed positive results. This paper explains the process each school used for allowing teachers to watch others teach and the results that they got in the process. This program evaluation was designed to provide guidance to principals on some specific ways to ensure that they can avoid pitfalls if they were to employ a similar strategy with their staff. Teachers using high yield strategies with confidence in their classrooms has the potential to improve student achievement and open opportunities beyond high school as well. This paper outlines that process.

1-A

 

Mitchell, Markisha. Educational Leadership. Program Evaluation for Assessing the Effectiveness of Tracking the Academic Growth and Attendance of African-American Students in Closing the African-American and White Achievement Gap

Across the United States in almost every city, every suburb and every rural area there is a gap between the achievement of Black and White students. The term ‘achievement gap’ has become an accepted label in situations where Black students severely underperform relative to their White counterparts. Many school Districts have discretely avoided discussing and or addressing the gap for decades. School District Z, located in an urban suburb just outside of a large midwestern city, is the focus of this research as they attempt to address the gap. District Z is comprised of approximately two-thirds students of color, yet the achievement gap between Black and White students is 37 and 41 percentage points in reading and math respectively. District Z’s plan of attack is to require principals to track the attendance and academic achievement of all Black students as part of their evaluation. This research explores the effectiveness of tracking the attendance and academic growth of Black students on the achievement gap between Black and White students by examining standardized assessment data since the initiative was put in place. What I found was that District Z’s gap closing program was not effective and in fact the achievement gap between white and black students widened over a five year span. At the conclusion of this article I will provide an analysis of the data and research based practices that may narrow District Z’s achievement gap.

2-C

 

Ochoa, Pablo. Reading and Language. Elementary School Latinx Parent Involvement Through Reading Engagement Opportunities: A Case Study of a Spanish-Speaking Parent Book Club Using Children’s Literature

This qualitative case study explored what occurred when six Latinx, bilingual (Spanish/English) parents and an elementary school bilingual coordinator (and the study researcher) engaged in a Book Club using the same historical fiction text as that employed in the school’s fifth grade classroom. The parents’ children all attended the K-8 elementary school located in a large Midwestern city. Research questions focused on a) how they engaged in the Book Club, b) how they connected to the focal text(s), and c) what new learning they reported as a result of this experience. Data included audiotapes of five hour-long book club sessions, parent written/artistic artifacts, participant interviews, and researcher retrospective field notes and reflective journal entries for each session. Findings from the study suggest that positive partnerships between schools and parents can occur within family engagement opportunities in Book Clubs built on existing relationships with school personnel and which provide space for the continued development of relationship development. Other factors which promoted parent engagement included the use of authentic literature and literacy activities that allowed for parent choice and voice, and opportunities to draw on cultural Funds of Knowledge and life experiences, and to ask questions, make inferences and connections, and facilitate learning for one another. Most importantly, parental participation in this Book Club improved their perceptions that they could better assist their children learn to read given their own reports of new learning about literacy instruction and reading.

2-A

 

Qing, Xin (Helen). Disability and Equity in Education. Challenges and Opportunities of Chinese Immigrant Students with Intellectual Disabilities in Transition Services

The purpose of this study is to examine the challenges and opportunities that Chinese immigrant students with intellectual disabilities in transition services in the greater Chicago area encounter in the community, work place and life. Drawing on interviews with the students and their families, this study identifies cultural attitudes toward disability that can hinder students’ ability to find sustaining competitive employment and to become meaningfully included in the communities in which they work and live. The study also addresses the impact service agencies have had in changing negative attitudes in the communities they serve by making transition services and principles accessible to clients and their families.

1-B

 

Roberson, Tonya. Community Psychology. Using Culturally-Tailored Holistic College Health Assessments at a Historically Black College and University (HBCU) to address health inequities

African Americans (AAs) get sicker and die at a younger age from preventable ailments and diseases than White Americans (WAs). Although some significant contributions in eliminating these racial health inequalities have been made, there are still gaps that have not been addressed. The need to implement culturally-specific research data tools and increase the research participation of AAs across the age range to reduce the existing health inequities is imperative. AA students at a Historically Black College or University (HBCU) represent a ‘unique’ population for promoting health equity and prevention and HBCUs serve as excellent public health partners. In a collegiate-based study, a sequential exploratory design at a private HBCU in Atlanta, Georgia was conducted. A purposive sample of (n-403) gender and classification of AA students completed a self-administered, culturally-tailored, 80 question health assessment and three- focus group discussions with HBCU students and Panhellenic Council members (n-30) was led. These assessments were based on individuality related to their holistic health, including spirituality, family history, ethnic identity and impediments to health to pinpoint specific barriers. Findings in this study provided the health perceptions, behavior and knowledge of this population and how they impacted their health. The analyses presented foundational information to strategize and design sustainable health education and disease prevention interventions leading to better health and creating healthy opportunities for AAs of all ages. Continued research and collaborations is essential with AA researchers, HBCUs and community physicians to develop sustainable HBCU health interventions, improve AA student’s research participation and impact health inequities.

2-C

 

Strong, Carolyn. Curriculum, Advocacy, and Policy. Black Girl Blues: The need for culturally competent discipline

Black Blues Blues examines the representations of African American women from a historical prospective. It then contextualizes those representations and argues that they contribute to the rise in both physical and relational aggression of African American girls in school. It then argues that a major step toward rectifying the aforementioned is culturally competent discipline programs in schools.

1-C

 

Thompson, Dorothy. Educational Leadership. Equitable Implementation and Facilitation of Senate Bill 100 for District-Wide Student Success and Safety: A Policy Advocacy Project

The third section of the dissertation examined how three school districts equitably implemented Senate Bill 100. The districts’ policies were reviewed to see how parents were involved in establishing the discipline and bullying policies and how information was communicated to the parents and students. The data for the districts highlighted the discipline and expulsion rates of students by race, gender, achievement gap, and social, economic status. The presentation highlights how three school districts equitably implement Senate Bill 100. The districts’ policies were reviewed to see how parents were involved in establishing the discipline and bullying policies and how information was communicated to the parents and students. The data for the districts highlighted the discipline and expulsion rates of students by race, gender, achievement gap, and social, economic status.

1-C

Locations
  • CHICAGO DOWNTOWN CAMPUS

    NLU’s Chicago campus on South Michigan Avenue occupies five floors of the historic Peoples Gas Building. This landmark building, across the street from the Art Institute of Chicago and Grant Park, is easily accessible by train, bus and car and is surrounded by restaurants, parking lots/garages and shops.

    122 S. Michigan Avenue
    Chicago, IL 60603
    (888) 658.8632
    Info » | Directions »
  • ELGIN

    Conveniently located in a fast-growing business district off I-90 and Route 31, NLU Elgin features 10 classrooms with high-tech media equipment; a computer lab with high-speed Internet access; two conference rooms; and comfortable student lounges. Parking is free at this recently remodeled and upgraded teaching site, which now includes wireless Internet access.

    620 Tollgate Road
    Elgin, IL 60123
    (888) 658.8632
    Info » | Directions »
  • NORTH SHORE

    Opened in the summer of 2006, NLU North Shore at Skokie is a state-of-the-art modern campus located just off the Edens Expressway near the Old Orchard Shopping Center. The campus includes 44 wireless classrooms equipped with high-tech media equipment; four computer labs with high-speed Internet access, including a walk-in lab in the library; six conference rooms; a public café for beverages and snacks; a student welcome center; a library for research and study; and multiple, comfortable student lounge areas.

    5202 Old Orchard Road
    Skokie, IL 60077
    (888) 658.8632
    Info » | Directions »
  • LISLE

    Located just minutes from the East-West Tollway (I-88), NLU Lisle features 42 wireless classrooms equipped with high-tech media equipment; four computer labs with high-speed Internet access, including a separate walk-in lab in the library; a café for beverages and snacks; a student welcome center; a library for research and study; conference rooms; and six comfortable student lounge areas with wireless access.

    850 Warrenville Road
    Lisle, IL 60532
    (888) 658.8632
    Info » | Directions »
  • WHEELING

    Located in one of Chicago's major northwest suburbs, the newly renovated NLU Wheeling includes 20 classrooms with high-tech media equipment, four conference rooms, four computer labs with high-speed Internet access, large student lounge areas with wireless capabilities and interactive video capabilities, and an extensive research library. The site also houses the university library research collection.

    1000 Capitol Drive
    Wheeling, IL 60090
    (888) 658.8632
    Info » | Directions »
  • FLORIDA (TAMPA)

    Established in 1988 and located in one of Tampa's major business districts, NLU's Florida Regional Center serves students in 13 counties in central Florida. In addition to its classrooms, the National Louis University Tampa Regional Center features a computer lab, student lounges, and conference room.

    5110 Sunforest Drive, Suite 102
    Tampa, FL 33634
    (800) 366.6581
    Info » | Directions »