ILLINOIS READING RECOVERY CENTER FOR LITERACY

ul 3.18.13

ul 3.18.13

Partnerships in Comprehensive Literacy (PCL) Implementation Standards

Illinois Reading Recovery Center for Literacy at National-Louis University in partnership with The Center for Literacy at University of Arkansas at Little Rock.

Vision:

To develop self-regulated learners who meet rigorous state and national academic standards.

Mission:

To develop self-regulated learners with the capacity to guide and monitor their learning to meet the needs of a global society.

Goal:

To develop a seamless transition across school programs, curriculum approaches, and assessment systems where best practices in literacy instruction are implemented to create intellectual environments that make literate thinking a top priority for students.

Ten Features of the Partnership in Comprehensive Literacy Model

  1. Framework for Literacy uses a workshop approach for meeting the needs of all students within an integrated, inquiry-based curriculum.

  2. Coaching and Mentoring – using contingent scaffolding, coaching cycles, and a gradual release model for increasing teacher efficiency.

  3. Model Classrooms--Creating constructivist settings where teachers meet together to apprentice one another in implementing the literacy framework.

  4. High Standards are based on the Common Core Standards and professional standards that align with specific benchmarks along a literacy continuum.

  5. Comprehensive Assessment System –  includes a school-wide seamless assessment system with multiple measures for evaluating success.

  6. System Interventions include Reading RecoveryÒ and small group interventions in grades K-3 and classroom and supplemental group interventions in grades 4-12.

  7. Collaborative Learning Teams (Professional Learning Communities) --Uses authentic contexts for learning, including study groups, book clubs, peer observations, cluster conferences, and demonstration lessons.

  8. Well-Designed Literacy Plan includes short and long-term goals with specific benchmarks for continuous literacy development

  9. Technology for Learning Uses technology to learn about the world, including searching for information, communicating with others, and creating new products.

  10. Spotlighting and Advocacy –includes techniques for disseminating information on the model, school successes, including news releases, articles, school reports, and presentations.

Standards for Districts Implementing the PCL Model

A. District Responsibilities

Districts administrators understand the schools' or district's roles and responsibilities for implementing the Partnership in Comprehensive Literacy model. They agree to implement the model as outlined by the PCL Training Center, including the implementation of a Comprehensive Intervention Model (CIM) that provides layers of support for struggling learners across grade levels.

The District Administrator

  1. Understands the importance of the PCL implementation standards and agrees that PCL schools will implement the model with depth and fidelity.

  2. Agrees to support PCL schools in implementing the Comprehensive Intervention Model (CIM) with depth and fidelity, including Reading Recovery for struggling first graders and supplemental intervention groups throughout all grades.

  3. Provides district and school-based coaches with the necessary materials to implement the model as outlined by the PCL Training Center.

  4. Ensures that principals and literacy coaches will meet their roles and responsibilities within the model, as outlined by the PCL Training Center.

  5. Agrees to continue funding the PCL model for a minimum of two years beyond the training year.

B. District Coach Qualifications, Roles and Responsibilities

District Coaches have knowledge in four interrelated areas: 1) literacy theory, 2) effective literacy practices and assessments, 3) coordinating and managing a literacy program, and 4) working with adults, including knowledge of coaching and mentoring techniques. The major role of district literacy coaches is to support school-based coaches with school-embedded professional development, to manage, coordinate, and assess the school's literacy program, to teach students every day in a variety of settings and grade levels, to participate in the literacy coach network, and to self-reflect on professional learning and literacy goals.

The District Coach

  1. Understands the goals of the PCL model and is committed to implementing the model with depth and fidelity.

  2. Maintains the integrity of the model by adhering to the roles and responsibilities of the coach as outlined by the PCL Training Center.

  3. Participates in all sessions of literacy coach training/graduate coursework and meets all requirements to ensure the successful implementation of the PCL model.

  4. Agrees to continue the implementation of the PCL model for a minimum of two years after the initial year of training.

  5. Collects and analyzes district data to assess and inform teaching and learning.

  6. Spotlights and advocates for the PCL model with parents, staff, district administrators and school board members and within the district.

  7. Uses the discussion board and other electronic communications to solve problems and collaborate with other coaches, colleagues, and peers.

  8. Agrees to submit an annual research report to the PCL Training Center.

C. School-Based Literacy Coach Qualifications, Roles and Responsibilities

The major role of the school-based literacy coach is to implement comprehensive literacy changes at the school level. Toward this goal, the responsibilities of an effective literacy coach include: providing demonstrations of the literacy framework; working strategically with teachers in planning, monitoring, and assessing their teaching; observing and coaching teachers in effective literacy practices; conducting pre- and post conferences with teachers, including constructive feedback; planning and facilitating literacy team meetings, professional study groups, and staff development sessions in best literacy practices; and teaching an intervention group of students for 30 to 40 minutes daily.

The School-Based Literacy Coach

  1. Maintains the integrity of the program by adhering to the roles and responsibilities of the coach as outlined by the PCL Training Center.

  2. Uses sustained coaching cycles to support teachers' growth and reflective practices.

  3. Meets routinely with the building administrator(s) to organize, analyze, reflect and plan and problem-solve around implementation issues and for the needs of the school.

  4. Manages and evaluates the school's literacy program to ensure the highest level of quality. Develops and maintains an assessment system for monitoring the progress of students and ensuring that any student who falls below the proficient level receives appropriate and timely literacy intervention and support.

  5. Assists teachers in linking assessment information and classroom instruction and regularly evaluates the quality of academic support services to meet the needs of all students.

  6. Makes curricular recommendations for appropriate reading and writing materials across the school.

  7. Participates in all sessions of literacy coach training/graduate coursework and meets all requirements to ensure the successful implementation of the PCL model in Year 1.

  8. Provides leadership for literacy across the school community and collaborates with other literacy specialists to assure that the literacy framework remains central to the school's total academic program.

  9. Uses discussion board and other electronic communications to solve problems and collaborate with other coaches, colleagues, and peers.

  10. Agrees to continue the implementation of the PCL model for a minimum of two years after the initial year of training.

  11. Agrees to submit to the PCL Training Center all records, research data, and written documentation as requested for each year of involvement in the model.

  12. Accepts the roles and responsibilities of the Training Center and understands their importance for school change.

D. School: Building Administrator

School administrators understand the school's roles and responsibilities of implementing the Partnership in Comprehensive Literacy model. They agree to implement the model as outlined by the training center, including the implementation of a Comprehensive Intervention Model that provides layers of support for struggling learners across grade levels.

Standards

  1. Participate in the Network of Literacy Administrators (NLA), including attendance at NLA meetings and the Administrators' Institute at the fall Reading Recovery/K-8 Comprehensive Literacy Conference.

  2. Attend a summer orientation on the PCL model.

  3. Provide funding for the coach and some teachers to attend the annual Reading Recovery/K-8 Comprehensive Literacy conference.

  4. Ensure that the curriculum is aligned to state and national professional standards with benchmarks designed to monitor students' progress.

  5. Attend team meetings and provide common release time for teachers to study professional texts and problem-solve on teaching and learning issues.

  6. Implement a school wide intervention program with a fully implemented Reading Recovery program for the lowest first graders and supplemental small-group support for grades K-8. Accountability also includes a school wide seamless assessment system with multiple measures (including formative and summative) for evaluating student progress over time.

  7. Ensure the literacy coach adheres to the roles and responsibilities as outlined by the PCL Training Center and aligned with the Standards of the International Reading Association.

  8. Provide funding for a wide range of reading materials designed to match student needs (including classroom libraries, guided reading books, nonfiction texts to support content learning, big books, poetry, etc.).

E. Classroom Teacher Roles and Responsibilities

Classroom teachers understand their roles and responsibilities of implementing the Partnership in Comprehensive Literacy Model. They agree to implement the model as outlined by the training center. Teachers organize the classroom to meet the needs of diverse learners, including selecting appropriate materials and working with whole group, small group, and individual learners. Teachers use a workshop approach to learning across the curriculum, including reading, writing, language, and content workshops. Small group reading and writing instruction is provided to meet the needs of diverse learners; and explicit mini-lessons are tailored to meet the needs of the majority of students across the curriculum. Daily one-to-one conferences are scheduled with students during the workshop framework.

The Classroom Teacher

  1. Implements a workshop approach across the curriculum.

  2. Analyzes data to monitor student learning and inform teaching decisions.

  3. Engages in pre-and post-conferences with the literacy coach.

  4. Collaborates with colleagues on effective literacy practice.

  5. Participates in intervention team meetings and collaborates with intervention specialists in aligning interventions for struggling learners.

  6. Provides a classroom intervention for children who are performing below level.

  7. Participates in weekly team meetings with grade level colleagues to plan, reflect and problem-solve around implementation issues and to discuss students' progress.

  8. Uses discussion boards to problem-solve with other literacy professionals.

  9. Seeks opportunities to attend PCL conferences and institutes.
Locations
  • CHICAGO DOWNTOWN CAMPUS

    NLU’s Chicago campus on South Michigan Avenue occupies five floors of the historic Peoples Gas Building. This landmark building, across the street from the Art Institute of Chicago and Grant Park, is easily accessible by train, bus and car and is surrounded by restaurants, parking lots/garages and shops.

    122 S. Michigan Avenue
    Chicago, IL 60603
    (888) 658.8632
    Info » | Directions »
  • ELGIN

    Conveniently located in a fast-growing business district off I-90 and Route 31, NLU Elgin features 10 classrooms with high-tech media equipment; a computer lab with high-speed Internet access; two conference rooms; and comfortable student lounges. Parking is free at this recently remodeled and upgraded teaching site, which now includes wireless Internet access.

    620 Tollgate Road
    Elgin, IL 60123
    (888) 658.8632
    Info » | Directions »
  • NORTH SHORE

    Opened in the summer of 2006, NLU North Shore at Skokie is a state-of-the-art modern campus located just off the Edens Expressway near the Old Orchard Shopping Center. The campus includes 44 wireless classrooms equipped with high-tech media equipment; four computer labs with high-speed Internet access, including a walk-in lab in the library; six conference rooms; a public café for beverages and snacks; a student welcome center; a library for research and study; and multiple, comfortable student lounge areas.

    5202 Old Orchard Road
    Skokie, IL 60077
    (888) 658.8632
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  • LISLE

    Located just minutes from the East-West Tollway (I-88), NLU Lisle features 42 wireless classrooms equipped with high-tech media equipment; four computer labs with high-speed Internet access, including a separate walk-in lab in the library; a café for beverages and snacks; a student welcome center; a library for research and study; conference rooms; and six comfortable student lounge areas with wireless access.

    850 Warrenville Road
    Lisle, IL 60532
    (888) 658.8632
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  • WHEELING

    Located in one of Chicago's major northwest suburbs, the newly renovated NLU Wheeling includes 20 classrooms with high-tech media equipment, four conference rooms, four computer labs with high-speed Internet access, large student lounge areas with wireless capabilities and interactive video capabilities, and an extensive research library. The site also houses the university library research collection.

    1000 Capitol Drive
    Wheeling, IL 60090
    (888) 658.8632
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  • FLORIDA (TAMPA)

    Established in 1988 and located in one of the city's major business districts, NLU's Florida Regional Center serves students in 13 counties in central Florida. In addition to six classrooms, this location features a conference room, a computer lab with high-speed Internet access, an extensive research library and comfortable student lounges.

    5110 Eisenhower Boulevard Suite 102
    Tampa, FL 33634
    (800) 366.6581
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  • WISCONSIN

    NLU's Milwaukee campus has a proud history of serving graduate students in education in southeastern Wisconsin. Nearly one in five certified Wisconsin teachers looks to NLU for graduate education programs – more than any other university in the state. In addition to classrooms with high-tech media equipment, the campus offers a state-of-the-art computer lab with wireless Internet access and an extensive IDS research library.

    12000 West Park Place, Suite 100
    Milwaukee, WI 53224-3007
    (414) 577.2658
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